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Are You Ready for the Responsibility?

SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITES POSSESS MANY OF THE SKILLS LISTED BELOW.

HOW ABOUT YOU?

TAKE THE INVENTORY.

DISCOVER THE SKILLS AND ATTITUDES
YOU NEED TO DEVELOP
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Evaluate your readiness for the responsibilities associated with college. Going to college is a major step in your life involving new responsibilities and independence. Below are some questions you need to ask yourself as you embark on your college career.

  • Can I clearly explain my special talents and abilities?

  • Can I describe my disability so that someone else understands my strengths and limitations?

  • Do I have copies of the evaluations that document the current impact of my disability?

  • Do I understand and can I discuss the content of these reports?

  • Can I describe my disability history and explain the diagnosis?

  • Can I explain how I learn and how I compensate in the areas where I have difficulty?

  • Can I describe the types of academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services appropriate for me in various classroom settings and in my living environment, if needed?

  • In the past, have I used similar academic adjustments and auxiliary aids and services to those I need in college?

  • Do I know where, how, and when to apply for disability services at college?

  • Am I prepared (academically and socially) for the challenge college has to offer?

  • Do I take regular college preparatory courses, modified courses, or individualized courses?

  • Do I do the same assignments, participate in the same laboratory exercises, have the same opportunities to use a computer, and learn the same course material as everyone else?

  • Am I ready to live away from home, to manage my finances, to take care of my health, and to manage my time?

  • Do I seek assistance for academic and other problems when needed?

  • Do I know how to advocate for myself?

  • Do I accept that it might take me longer to graduate than my friends?

  • Do I understand that I might have to study harder than my friends?

  • Do I understand that college is a challenge and that dealing with temporary frustrations is part of being an ordinary college student?

  • Do I know my long-term goals? Am I beginning this life-changing process with some career goals?

  • Do I have some idea about how I want to earn a living?


Excerpted from Virginia's College Guide for Students with Disabilities (2003 Edition).
Available at http://www.pen.k12.va.us